fibro brain and reading

Noooo graphicA friend recently sent me a link to this blog post. It highlights the wonderful power that the internet has to help banish loneliness. I really do mean that. I thought it was just me…

I so miss reading, it defined who I was in so many ways. I was a member of not one but two reading groups. I subscribed to multiple film magazines, computer magazines…I didn’t just read, I consumed the written word in all its forms. From The Sandman graphic novels to victorian classics.

After my Dad died (I was a young teenager) the only books I could concentrate on enough to read were ‘Mills and Boon’ ultra lightweight romances. Gradually (over the course of years) via Agatha Christie, I slowly found my way back to my ‘normal’ – breathing in fiction and non-fiction with equal fervour. 

Now I have fibro and apart from rare short patches, I can’t read any more. The latest Stephen King and Neil Gaiman and hosts of other books by my favourite authors sit on shelves or in my kindle waiting neglected and unread 🙁 A veritable feast of fiction awaits me. But all I can manage to read is the occasional Charlaine Harris or Carolyn Brown. Magazine subscriptions have been cancelled – on the rare occasions I can’t resist buying a magazine, it remains mostly unread. 

Amazon wish list

Why do I keep adding books to wish lists?!


I no longer have a clue what films are due on at the cinema and I used to be a movie buff as obsessive as Tony DiNozzo 😉 Though I suspect part of that is probably due to the fact that I’m rarely well enough to get to the cinema now. I certainly couldn’t cope with an Indiana Jones marathon any more… It feels like yet more pieces of me have been robbed by the illness. I’ve lost so many people to illness that I know I should be grateful Fibro isn’t terminal, but occasionally on dark days I can only see what its stolen from me and that there seems to be no hope…

Sky through the trees

44/52

With regard to Lisa’s post/s – Liverpool UK is kind of the breast cancer capital of the country. (Possibly even Europe.) They won’t/don’t officially acknowledge that information, but mustard gas was made here during the first world war and it got into the water table…we have a big womens hospital here AND a dedicated breast cancer centre named after Linda MaCartney. Thankfully the most recent of mums friends to have had their breast cancer return, and spread to her bones etc, is responding very well to the new treatment. Heh, unlike some parts of the UK we have a big choice of cancer drugs here…lucky huh?

Lisa B Adams blog post – http://lisabadams.com/2013/07/05/my-brain-on-cancer-confessions-of-a-recent-non-reader

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2 Comments

  1. I’m another avid reader and have also found my concentration wavering since I’ve been ill, but audio books have been my salvation. I’ve got a small collection of my own, including childhood favourites such as Wind in the Willows which are great for really bad days, but mostly I borrow them from the library.

    I’m very lucky that our library service includes ME as a disability that entitles borrowers to free audio books and they have a fantastic collection of unabridged titles that can be requested online for collection at the library. There is a delivery service for people who are housebound, but I don’t know how you apply/qualify for that.

    If I fall asleep while a CD or tape is playing I just rewind until I recognise what I’m hearing! Being read to by a good narrator is wonderfully soothing – much better than listening to the radio IMO.

    • Our library has audio books too – they’re free to anyone though, didn’t realise we were lucky! Glad you can get them free too 🙂 also glad you can concentrate ( and fall asleep) to them. Thats great.
      My faves – which I’ve gotten either for birthdays or via an Audible promotion are by Bill Bryson. I love his voice as well as his writing. Ive also got a few others, but seem to find them difficult too…can manage for short periods. I enjoy Radio four comedy podcasts…but I’m having a hard time with almost everything. Even music – used to listen to music a lot. Now its hardly ever. Suppose its kind of fascinating how much a chronic illness impacts on your life, all the areas it changes, most of them not the least bit obvious…
      Thanks for stopping by 🙂
      Hope you’re coping with the heat? Today is horrible… 🙁 My life is filled with Marigold days 😉 xxx

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